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Home > Hits Menu > Hits List > "SAVE THE BEST FOR LAST" by VENESSA WILLIAMS > Summary
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SAVE THE BEST FOR LAST

 
SONG & HIT DETAILS
 
Artist Name: VENESSA WILLIAMS
 
 
Song Author: Phil Galdston, Wendy Waldman, Jon Lind
 
 
SONG PROFILE
 
Save the Best for Last

Single by Vanessa Williams from the album The Comfort Zone
B-side "Freedom Dance" (U.S.), "2 Of A Kind" (Europe)
Released January 14, 1992
Format cassette single, 7" single, CD maxi-single
Recorded 1990
Genre Pop
Length 3:40
Writer(s) Phil Galdston, Wendy Waldman, Jon Lind
Producer Keith Thomas

"Save The Best For Last" is a 1992 single written by Phil Galdston, Wendy Waldman and Jon Lind in March 1989. It is considered Vanessa Williams' signature song. The lyrics' redemptive themes resonated with Williams' story, as she had put together a successful recording career following her earlier Miss America resignation scandal.

The song is a ballad about a young female admirer of a single man who stands by and watches as the object of her desires goes through years of dating, before he finally unexpectedly decides to consummate a relationship with the singer.

"Save The Best For Last" was not written specifically for Vanessa Williams. There were a number of other singers who were offered the song, they all turned it down. While recording her album The Comfort Zone, at the last minute, a song had to be replaced. Vanessa was played "Save The Best For Last", and Vanessa said: "I can't believe nobody wants this song. I have to have this song."

The single was Williams' third number one on the Soul singles chart and topped the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 for five weeks in 1992.

"Save the Best for Last" was ranked fourth in the Billboard Top 100 hits of 1992, becoming the biggest success of Williams' music career. The song also went to #1 on the U.S. adult contemporary and R&B charts; it remained atop these charts for three weeks apiece.

Internationally, the single shot to number one in Australia, the Netherlands, and Canada, and to number three in the United Kingdom, number two in Ireland, and number three in Japan. ASCAP named it as its Song of the Year, meaning it was performed more than any other song in 1992, and it was nominated for the Grammy Award for Song of the Year and Record of the Year in 1993 losing to Eric Clapton's Tears In Heaven in both categories.